KU Concludes the Letter of Understanding on the archeological projects in the Tikal National Park between the Vice-Ministry of Cultural and Natural Heritage of the Ministry of Culture and Sports and the UNESCO Office in Guatemala

On September 21, Kanazawa University concluded the Letter of Understanding on the project of "Conservation of the North Acropolis of Tikal" between the Vice-Ministry of Cultural and Natural Heritage of the Ministry of Culture and Sports and the UNESCO Office in Guatemala, in the National Palace of Guatemala.

Vice President Hiroshi Yamamoto (in charge of International Affairs, Hospital and Alumni Association) and Professor Seiichi Nakamura (Center for Cultural Resource Studies) from Kanazawa University, Nobuyuki Shirakata, Chargés d'affaires ad interim from Embassy of Japan in Guatemala, Mr. Jose Luis Chea, Minister of the Ministry of Culture and Sports, Mr. Juan Alberto Monzon Esquivel, Deputy Minister of Cultural and Natural Heritage of the Ministry of Culture and Sports and Mr. Julio Antonio Carranza Valdes, Director and Representative of the UNESCO Office in Guatemala attended the concluding ceremony.

Kanazawa University concluded this Letter of Understanding to lead the project upon introducing “UNESCO Japanese Funds-in-Trust for the Preservation of the World Cultural Heritage Projects” on the activities of “the North Acropolis of Tikal” in the Tikal National Park where Kanazawa University have been expanding archeological projects and to confirm the mutual support system among 3 parties. It is expected that Kanazawa University’s internationally eminent research activities in the first World Mixed Heritage Site (registered in 1979) located in Tikal National Park will be further expanded through utilizing this funds.

Vice President Yamamoto and other delegates visited the Tikal Office of Kanazawa University in the Tikal National Park and central area of the Tikal Site on the day before the ceremony. They interacted with the students of local elementary and junior high schools who were visiting in the JICA Partnership Program (Grassroots Technical Cooperation Program)  implemented by the Center for Cultural Resource Studies.